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Toyota To Commit $13.6B In Car Batteries Over The Next Ten Years

Toyota will invest $13.6 billion on battery technology over the next decade, including $9 billion in production, as it strives to electrify its car fleet.

By 2025, it is expected to have ten battery production lines, with a total of roughly 70 spanning an undisclosed number of factories around the world. According to Masahiko Maeda, the company’s chief technology officer, the company might eventually create up to 200GWh of batteries.

Toyota’s pledges are similar to those made by others in the automotive sector. According to the Wall Street Journal, Volkwagen expects to generate roughly 240GWh of batteries in Europe alone by 2030.

Volkswagen wants to create about 240GWh of batteries in Europe alone by 2030, while Ford plans to produce 240GWh globally by 2030, including 140GWh in North America.

Toyota is making a significant investment, indicating that the world’s largest auto maker by volume is serious about electrifying its lineup. Despite being a pioneer in gas-electric hybrid cars with the Prius, Toyota is said to have seen hybrids as a stopgap measure until hydrogen fuel cells were affordable. Now, the corporation is catching up to Nissan and has reportedly fought to halt the transition to electric vehicles in the US.

Toyota unveiled an electric vehicle strategy earlier this year, stating that by 2025, it will have released 70 electric vehicles worldwide, including 15 fully electric vehicles, hybrids, and hydrogen-powered models.

It introduced the BZ4X concept electric SUV as part of the strategy, which it plans to launch in China and Japan later this year. According to the Wall Street Journal, by 2030, the business expects roughly 80% of its automobiles to have some form of battery power.

Toyota thinks that by investing in new materials and cell designs, it will be able to cut the cost of batteries by 30%.

On the vehicle side, it aims to produce vehicles that use batteries more efficiently, resulting in a 30% reduction in energy use per kilometer. “Through this integrated development of vehicles and batteries, we aim to reduce the battery cost per vehicle by 50 percent compared to the Toyota BZ4X in the second half of the 2020s,” Maeda stated.

The firm is also working on solid-state batteries, which could lead to more densely packed, safer, and faster charging cells in the future.

Toyota expects to start producing these batteries by the middle of the decade, but recognizes that further study is needed to increase the technology’s cost and lifespan.

Toyota stated that it “would like to contribute…by improving its adaptability to change and its competitiveness, as well as by aiming for the fundamental widespread acceptance of ever-better electrified vehicles.” clearly aligning with the goal of carbon neutrality to maintain environmental stability.

The automaker is also working on solid-state batteries, which might lead to more densely packed, safer, and faster charging cells in the future. Toyota expects to start producing these batteries by the middle of the decade, but recognizes that further study is needed to increase the technology’s cost and lifespan.

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